Emerald Ash Borer (EAB)

Emerald Ash Borer Information (Updated January 2016)
The emerald ash borer (EAB), a destructive insect of ash trees, was recently discovered and has been confirmed on the northwest side of the Village of Fox Point. The EAB was discovered near the Indian Creek detention basin located along the west side of Port Washington Road and south of Dean Road. There are now thirteen municipalities within Milwaukee County that are confirmed positive with this invasive pest which has also spread to and affected 25 states destroying tens of millions of ash trees.

Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis) is an invasive wood boring beetle that feeds on the tissues under the bark of ash trees (Fraxinus spp) and kills them. The metallic green beetle is native to East Asia and was accidentally imported to the United States within the wood of shipping crates from China. EAB was initially discovered in North America near Detroit, Michigan in 2002. Since then the beetle has spread rapidly to a great number eastern and Midwestern states, including Wisconsin. Click on the link for the most current map of the range of the infestation. 

Link to Map

Current Plans

Winter 2015-2016

During the fall/winter of 2015/2016, the Village is continuing with the program of removing additional lower condition ash trees.  A certified tree contractor hired by the Village is removing larger diameter trees; Village staff are removing the remainder.  Replanting with diverse species will occur during this spring’s planting season.  Replacement trees are being planted where an appropriate replanting site exists.  Additional lower condition ash trees will be removed during the fall/winter of 2016/2017.

Summer 2016
The Village's 2016 Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) Treatment Program will be starting in May.   Approximately 780 public ash trees (trees located directly behind roadside ditches in most areas) are planned to be treated in 2016. Trees that are part of the EAB treatment program are marked with either a single or double fluorescent green dot/dots at the base of the tree, on the street side.  A single dot is for soil-injected applications for smaller trees. This procedure is effective for one year. Two dots signify a trunk injected product for larger diameter trees.  Two horizontal dots indicate the treatment is performed in odd-numbered years (2013, 2015, etc.) and two vertical dots indicate treatment in even-numbered years (2014, 2016, etc.).   The trunk injection treatment is effective for two years.  Applicators are required to post warning signs at the pesticide application site. The signs must remain in place until sunset the day following the application.  Residents are encouraged to remove and dispose of the signs after this time.

Emerald Ash Border Bug
History
In southeastern Wisconsin (EAB) was first discovered on August 1, 2008 in Newburg, a small community in Ozaukee County located approximately 25 miles to the north-northwest of the Village of Fox Point.   In August 2009, EAB was discovered in Milwaukee County in the City of Franklin.  Emerald Ash borer (EAB) continues to spread throughout Milwaukee County and southeastern Wisconsin.  In 2011, the Village Board approved an EAB Initiative to put in place a management strategy to best manage the Village’s public ash population through the EAB infestation period.

A Real Threat
EAB is not a threat to human health but it does threaten our forest and urban tree populations.  EAB is 100 percent fatal to our native ash trees of any size, any age, healthy or unhealthy, (according to research by Michigan State University and the US Forest Service).

Your Responsibilities
The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection (DATCP) have resources on their websites that discuss proactive ways in which residents can try to limit the impact and slow the spread of EAB.  We encourage Village residents to visit the links listed below to educate themselves about the ramifications of EAB.  The Village of Fox Point has been following the guidance provided by these departments and has engaged various management options to combat the beetle.

Treatment Options
“When should I start treatment if I want to protect an ash tree on my property?”   Unfortunately, there are differing opinions to this question and the facts are not fully conclusive.  There is still much to be learned.  One consistent fact to keep in mind, wherever new finds of EAB have been detected; the insect has already been there for 3 to 6 years.  This is important information to consider as you make your decision about treatment.  
Not all ash trees should be treated; it is a personal decision.  Healthy, high value, important trees are possible candidates for treatment: specimen trees, ones shading a home or patio, etc.

In many situations, planting a new tree may be better than trying to save an ash in average condition.  If you choose this option, be sure to plant a species of tree that you do not already have on your property.  This will help head off future invasive problems and increase the tree species diversity in the Village.

Treatment Assistance
Currently, the Village is not offering assistance for ash trees on private property.  Residents concerned about managing ash trees on their property are encouraged to contact an International Society of Arboriculture-certified arborist.  A listing of certified arborists “for hire” is located on the Wisconsin Arborist Association website http://www.waa-isa.org/arborist-for-hire/

We also recommend that Village residents use only firewood from their property or firewood purchased from a reputable local dealer.  Infested firewood is the primary transportation means for the beetle. 

Related Links
Finally, we encourage residents to keep abreast of the latest developments on the various EAB websites as they will provide updates and action plans accordingly.